Growing Successfully in the Covered Raised Bed

Earlier this year I introduced the Covered Raised Bed and many of you have asked what they’re like for planting.

My original reason for implementing this concept was to keep the chickens from eating my plants and it worked perfectly. As you can see the bed does keep the chickens out and it would also keep other types of critters away from eating your veggies.

Planting inside has been a great experience.

You might remember my transplanting post a couple weeks ago.  The plants did amazing and look at how big they’ve grown in a short period of time.

There’s a variety of things growing right now from broccoli, cauliflower and collards.  These plants will continue to grow tall and wide and the cover shouldn’t interfere which is fantastic.

Additional plants like, carrots, all types of lettuce, radish and cabbage would also make great options for this style of bed.

Our fall has been a little odd, temperatures are finally dropping into the 70’s and 80’s during the day and temperatures are around the low 50’s at night.  No frost yet and we shouldn’t see one until the middle of November.

I’ll cover the tops with plastic tarp to protect the plants when that time comes.

So to answer, these beds have really worked great.  In the future I might go with smaller beds as the covers can be a little heavy to lift at times.

The covered raised bed solved problems in my garden mostly that included my chickens.

14 comments

  1. Hello there!
    Thanks so much for stopping by my blog!!
    Oh I miss gardening in soil. My husband built me a beautiful Potager type garden a few years back, raised beds and all. Than we got root nematoads and could NOT get rid of them. Even the local ag center said they didn't know what else to try. We hot boxed, grew beneficial plants and toiled them into the soil, we tried about everything.
    Now we are growing things hydroponically. We love it but it's still a learning process.
    Thanks again for stopping by. Looking forward to following your blog now.

    1. I've heard a lot about hydroponics – my husbands wants to give that a try at our next property. We're going to be empty nesters soon so we' plan to sell and move further out in the country. He loves the idea and I'm warming up to it on a small scale. Thanks for sharing and hope you stop by again soon. -Carole

  2. Karen says:

    Another great gardening solution, Carole! It would work perfectly keeping the cats out too – which is my greatest "pest" challenge right now. How many hinges are on each cover? I'm sure there's lots of pressure and weight when it stands open? Obviously it works for you – just wondering about the specifics. 🙂
    Thanks for linking and sharing at Wake Up Wednesday.

    1. I have another post on this concept I wrote back, I think it was in April. You can find it on the Garden Space page. I also like it to keep our dogs out because they like to dig. So many benefits and it was a hit at the THG show. I have two hinges on these, You could also do three but I guess I ran out of steam that day. LOL – You could also add handles making it easier to open and close, I just lift it open and it rests on the ground while I'm planting, harvesting or weeding. You don't need to open it when you water and you can cover it with plastic to keep plants free from frost. It's pretty great. The ones I built at the show I used 2 x 3's for the top cover and it was a lot lighter they were also 5 ft instead of 8 ft. I love this style because it stands up to the wind. Glad you liked it and hope I helped answering your questions. Hope you're having a great weekend! -Carole

    2. Karen says:

      Ah! I see! For some reason I didn't imagine it opening all the way to the ground, rather just to the side while you had it opened. This makes perfect sense – not sure why I was thinking that way. ��
      Thanks, Carole! This is definitely going in my project files!

  3. Skye says:

    So clever! Now I have to get some chickens… Stumbling this post to help more people find it.

    1. It's also good for keeping dogs, cats and rodents out too. Thanks for sharing!
      Carole

  4. Kathi says:

    I love this idea, although my problem is grasshoppers so I might need to cover the frame with window screen. 🙂
    Kathi at Oak Hill Homestead

    1. Thanks Kathi – Grasshoppers don't mess with going inside. Which has been a blessing. I used chicken wire but you could also use something smaller to cover it with. -Carole

  5. Kenneth F says:

    Hello , I like this idea. The white painted frame may be what has kept the grass hoppers out. I have used a 16 in x 16 in wood panel ( painted white ) as a ground protector for my melons. I had a great melon crop. What I discovered also was the absence of bugs ruining my melons. It did not seem to bother the beneficial insects. Maybe the white panel made the pest an easy target.

    1. Very interesting White keeping the grass hoppers out – this thought makes me want to build another for spring and paint it a different color and see if that's the case. Good thought and thanks for sharing, I enjoy hearing what others are accomplishing in their gardens. I normally just use these beds for my fall garden planting because they are a breeze to cover when the frost arrives. -Carole

  6. Green Bean says:

    This is fantastic! I missed the discussion the first few times around but glad I heard it this time. My problem is not my chickens but the squirrels. Of course, they mostly go for the tomatoes so I would need something taller. Pinning though because this gives me a jumping off point.

    1. Glad you liked it – This design has been a blessing and it stands up to the wind which I really like. For Tomatoes I agree you would have to go up taller but you could add wired doors so you walk in – instead of lifting to get inside. I love all this discussion because it's giving me ideas for new projects. Thanks for stopping by to share.
      -Carole

  7. Jane says:

    what a great solution! would keep all kinds of critters out

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