New and Beginner Gardeners – Starting Small

Beginner Gardeners Always Start Small

New and Beginner gardeners I want to welcome you to the world of gardening.  It can be an overwhelming journey but I’m hoping to help by making this a bit easier and fun.

To begin the process of raising your own food my first tip is to start small, maybe two or three raised beds and simply grow what you love to eat.

Starting Small

Starting small even if you have an acre of land and you’re a first time gardener is a good place to begin.  Especially if your confidence may not be as grand.

This step allows you to learn how to use space correctly without getting overwhelmed.

Small gardens help you discover the journey of gardening to see if you even enjoy this activity.  It will also be less difficult to incorporate a schedule for the ongoing chores of weeding, soil amending, watering and harvesting.

I know there are many that will tell you otherwise, but if you’re working full time and still have a family to care for then the garden could become just another thing to do instead of something you enjoy.

However if you build your raised beds higher they’ll be easier to maintain.  Check out my no dig gardening tips here. 


You may also want to check out my book Startle Garden, it’s a step by step guide to growing your best garden and you can also receive my free garden planner in my newsletter.

We have a resource library full of helpful downloads and links to compliment your journey.

Additional Advantage to Starting Small

But let’s talk more about starting small and let’s just say your goal is to establish 2 raised beds.  You’ll need minimal equipment to accomplish this goal.

Build your own bed frames to save money like I did here: Building Raised Beds. You can also establish a raised bed by stacking landscaping timbers if building isn’t possible.

Make sure you find some good hand tools, don’t skimp and don’t buy plastic, spend a little more because you’ll have them for years.

Hand tools are perfect for raised beds and helpful for weeding after a good rain.

You’ll also need a good shovel, a hoe and don’t forget the garden gloves.  Most important before I completely forget – get a hat – gardening is more fun when you wear a hat that fits your personality.

So, if you’re ready to dig in, let’s begin with a couple raised beds, order my book and once it arrives let it be a guide to your gardening journey.

Beginner Gardeners Always Start Small

14 comments

  1. daisy g says:

    You are always so encouraging to beginners. I love that. I love your gardening tools-makes them easy to spot with the bright orange handles. You're invited to share this wonderful outdoor post on The Maple Hill Hop! Happy digging!

  2. I love it!! I always feel like I need to jump into anything new at 100, when I should really start at like 20. I can't wait to get moved (city still in question) and start a little garden. 🙂 I found you on the #SHINEbloghop

    1. I can relate – at some point I'm going to have to share my big dream garden that turned into a flop, which taught me many lessons as well. This was several years ago and my kids were little. Good luck the move and thanks for stopping by to share. Always fun to meet others! -Carole

  3. Echo A says:

    This is an amazing post for beginning gardeners! I can't wait to start our little garden this year!

    Thank you for sharing on the #SHINEBlogHop!

  4. MariaS says:

    I have a small area of my yard that I would love to plant flowers but it is full of grass, that Bermuda grass that spreads like a wild fire. I've been out there pulling and digging it up as much as possible but it always seems to come back.

    1. Bermuda is a pain. get a tiller if you can and pull out the chunks of grass. You can dump these chunks in a bare spot elsewhere. Establish some kind of rock border, you could also use timbers. Then dig a small trench to help keep the grass from coming through and over border. I will have to do a blog post on this later so I can show visually what I'm talking about. Heavy mulch in your bed will also keep the Bermuda down. A small tiller would be a good investment for helping to keep the Bermuda out of your beds. It's easiest to tackle this grass when the soil is damp. Hope that helps.
      -Carole

  5. Stoney Acres says:

    I so agree with you. Over the years as I have taught others to garden I have found it's the ones that start out with a small manageable garden that end of sticking with it and being successful!! Thanks for joining the From the Farm Hop this week! Rick

  6. Patti Estep says:

    Great advice. Starting small is manageable so that you are not easy overwhelmed. It's easy to get discouraged. I also like to tell people to be patient and realize that many many times it may not be your fault that something did not work. Most gardeners I know have plants that die on a regular basis, including me. Don't sweat it and get back on that horse. 🙂

  7. Patti Estep says:

    Great advice. Starting small is manageable so that you are not easy overwhelmed. It's easy to get discouraged. I also like to tell people to be patient and realize that many many times it may not be your fault that something did not work. Most gardeners I know have plants that die on a regular basis, including me. Don't sweat it and get back on that horse. 🙂

  8. Rue says:

    I had a garden about 5 years ago at my last house and wanted to start another one here, so I got a little carried away with the seed ordering LOL This was a good reminder. Thank you 🙂

  9. Kim says:

    I don't have a green thumb and I had given up, but I want to garden, so I love your post! I am starting over and starting small. Going to give it another try! 🙂

    1. I love that you're not giving up – please use me as a resource – I'd love to help anyway I can. 🙂
      -Carole

  10. Thanks for sharing your last past at Fabulous Friday Party on beginners gardeners, hope to see you again at this week party
    Maria
    http://www.simplenaturedecorblog.com/fabulous-friday-party-25/

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *