How to Keep Quail Cool

When hot and humid temperatures arrive, shade is what the quail seek.  Early in the morning and late evening seems to be a more enjoyable time for the quail to swarm the sanctuary.

Keeping cool is provided by using the shelter boxes.  I love these and they’re easy to build.

Mine are a basic style; you could do something fancier but after finding out they also enjoy sitting on top of the boxes it made sense to stay basic.

One thing  I like to do with these is move them every 4 to 5 days so they’re always on new grass.

Keeping their Water Cool

This time of year I fill their water in the morning and evening.

When temperatures reach 90 plus I like to keep the water feeders in a shaded area which can be difficult because this area doesn’t offer a whole lot of shade.

A few weeks ago I built this open shelter for the purpose of water container shade.  It’s big enough so on rainy days I can also place their food here to keep it dry.

This was a great solution and even works well in the winter when temperatures are close to freezing.

From Emu Shelter to Water Shade

This shelter was built quickly when we had baby emus on our farm, they out grew it pretty quick so I decided it would be good for the quail for additional water shelter.

Both structures have worked great and when it stops raining I’ll eventually get them painted.  These shelters can be made from new or reclaimed wood, which is what I did.

Additional Options

Additional options would include freezing their water or add ice cubes to containers to help keep cool   I tend to remind myself that nobody in the wild freezes their water so providing shade is an adequate response.

My goal is to raise these birds naturally.  My approach is a little different that what other’s do but the results are really fantastic.  If you’d like to begin raising quail in a natural environment check out my book, Quail Getting Started.

This is a complete beginner’s guide to raising quail naturally.

 

The grass also helps keep them cool during the day in conjunction with using the shelter boxes.  This flock is actually moving towards the back of the sanctuary looked like they’re heading for tall grass.

They’re about 8 and half weeks and larger than the Coturnix were at this age.

They will be full grown in another 6 – 8 weeks, which at that point we’ll thin out the males and enjoy a nice meal.

My Favorite Breed?

After observing these birds for the last eight weeks I’ve finally decided Bobwhites are my favorite.  This is because they’re active and just do a lot more which make their environment stimulating.

The Coturnix are also fun just a little too domestic for my style.  When I raised them on the ground they did amazing and really proved to be an awesome quail with great instincts.

Please understand, Bobwhite quail are more difficult to raise than the Coturnix.  For this reason beginners should really begin their experience with the Coturnix like I did because they’re hardier and you’ll have the opportunity to learn as much as you can before stepping up.

Don’t forget I started with 103 Bobwhite chicks and when they went outside I was down to 75.  It was frustrating because I’ve never experienced such a large life depart with any bird I’ve ever raised.

Quail are neat birds and might I add very resourceful.  As an owner you can help keep them cool but remember if given the right environment they will find ways to cool off themselves.

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